Table of Contents

1. 1988 & WHMIS 2015 / GHS Overview

2. 1988 & 2015 Classification

3. 1988 & 2015 Labels

4. 1988 (MSDS) Material Safety Data Sheet 

    WHMIS 2015 / GHS SDS (Safety Data Sheet)

5. 1988 Summary & Quiz


1988 WHMIS AND WHMIS 2015 / GST Classification  
(Hazard Groups, Categories  Symbols & Pictograms)


In order for a controlled material or substance to be given a Classification, a Pictogram and ultimately, in the workplace, a Label

the manufacturer / supplier,  must consider what;

(Hazard) Group

  1. Physical
  2. Health
  • Environmental*  (in GHS but not adopted by Health Canada in WHMIS 2015)
  • Explosive* (in GHS but not being adopted (is covered by  Explosive Regulation Act)  however you may still see the Exploding Bomb pictogram on WHMIS 2015 Labels

(Hazard) Classification 

  • will have at least one Hazard Category


(Hazard) Category (categorize)

       (may also be broken into further sub-categories)

Degree of Severity of Danger

Category 1 to Category 4

  • Category 1 being the MOST DANGEROUS
  • Category 4 being the least dangerous

the material will "fall" into.

Once the above is determined, a M.S.D.S. (1988)  / S.D.S. (2015) can be developed.

From that - the Supplier Label will be created


Signal Words

(Communicating, yet again, more immediate information)

Two Signal Words are used in GHS and have been adopted by WHMIS 2015.

  • "DANGER" - HIGH RISK
  • "WARNING"- LESS SEVERE HAZARDS

These will be followed by a HAZARD STATEMENT of a few words describing the more critical RISK(S) involved.

This will be displayed on the Supplier Label                       - see next section




Note:  The table below does not have to be memorized.  It is for your reference to help better understand how the classification system is Grouped.  

LEARN ABOUT ALL HAZARDOUS MATERIAL THAT MAY BE IN YOUR WORKPLACE / SITE  (SEE THE MSDS / SDS

Physical Hazards Group

Health    Hazards Group

Environmental Group+

 Explosives*

 Flammable gasses

 Flammable aerosols

 Oxidizing gases

 Gases under  pressure

 Flammable liquids

 Flammable solids

 Self-reactive   substances and  mixtures

 Pyrophoric liquids

 Pyrophoric solids

 Self-heating substances and mixtures

 Substances and mixtures which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

 Oxidizing liquids

 Oxidizing solids

 Organic peroxides

 Corrosive to metals

 Combustible dusts

 Simple asphyxiants

 Pyrophoric gases

 Physical hazards not others classified


 Acute toxicity

 Skin corrosion / irritation

 Serious eye damage / eye irritation

 Respiratory or skin sessitization

 Germ cell mutagenicity

 Carcinogenicity

 Reproductive toxicity

 Specific target organ toxicity - single exposure

 Specific target organ toxicity - repeated exposure

 Aspiration hazard

 Bio-hazardous infections materials

 Health hazards not otherwise classified

 Hazardous to the aquatic environment

Hazardous to the ozone layer

A point of clarification.  See below

A symbol (right) has no "frame or border" thus it is not a pictogram.  

A pictogram consists of a symbol with the frame or border" around it.  A symbol is usually (not always) "inserted into" a border frame.  

For the purpose of this course, if we say "symbol" or "pictogram" we mean one and the same.


Within the 1988 WHMIS program there are are six CLASSIFICATIONS (Class D has three sub-divisions - with two extra pictograms) making for a total of eight pictograms; any of which may be seen on a product identification label (see next section)

WHMIS 2015 / GHS uses ten (10) Classifications (Pictograms)


IF A PRODUCT MEETS THE CRITERIA WITHIN THESE CLASSIFICATIONS THEN THAT PRODUCT IS CALLED A CONTROLLED PRODUCT AND IS SUBJECT TO WHMIS REGULATIONS


The HAZARDOUS PRODUCTS ACT and the CONTROLLED PRODUCTS REGULATIONS do not require WHMIS labels and MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDS) for the following types of products;

  • a restricted product when packaged as a consumer product (example - bleach which is within a bottle of bleach for sale in a grocery or other type of store)
  • explosives - because they are already regulated by the Explosives Act
  • any product or substance such as cosmetic, drug or food which is already "covered" by the Food and Drugs Act
  • any pest control product within the meaning of the Pest Control Products Act
  • a prescribed substance (an example could be certain medications) within the meaning of the Atomic Energy Control Act
  • wood or wood products
  • a manufactured product (various composites and particle boards, or a tire which has chemicals in it but once it is in a store it is considered safe for it's intended use )
  • tobacco or products made of tobacco
  • hazardous wastes
  • hazardous goods being transported also do not "fall" under WHMIS because these good are already regulated by the DANGEROUS GOODS ACT


1988 WHMIS Classification Symbols

WHMIS 2015 / GHS Classification Symbols


 CLASS A COMPRESSED  GAS

- Compressed gases

- Dissolved gases

- Liquified gases by compression or refrigeration

Gas Cylinder

- Gases under pressure


 CLASS B    FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL

Any substance which may catch fire or explode with an ignition source

FLAMMABLE - the substance will ignite more easily than COMBUSTIBLE

Example: Acetone is more FLAMMABLE than a COMBUSTIBLE liquid such as Kerosene.

Flame

Flammable Hazards


 CLASS C  OXIDIZING MATERIAL

The product contributes to the combustion of another material by yielding oxygen or other oxidizing substance or it is an organic peroxide

Flame Over Circle

Oxidizing Hazards 


 CLASS D  POISONOUS AND INFECTIOUS MATERIALS

DIVISION 1 - Materials causing immediate and serious toxic effects. (can cause death in small amounts) (examples are sodium cyanide and hydrogen sulphide)

Skull and Crossbones

Very toxic material that can cause illness or death with small amounts and short time exposure


DIVISION 2 Other TOXIC affects. 

This symbol / pictogram is not used in WHMIS 2015 / GHS

Can cause immediate or long-term effects. Some long-term affects may lead to death (example - asbestos exposure may lead to cancer thus death)

Health Hazard 

Materials that can cause serious health effects


DIVISION 3  BIOHAZARDOUS INFECTIOUS MATERIAL Materials which contain harmful micro-organisms.

Biohazardous Infectious Materials 

The continued use of the above (Biohazardous) symbol/pictogram is still under review


CLASS E  CORROSIVE MATERIAL

Any acid or caustic type of material. This may be harmful to the skin or other objects. (i.e. metal)

Corrosion

Corrosive damage to materials as well as skin, eyes, body in general


CLASS F DANGEROUSLY REACTIVE MATERIAL

These are materials which, when subjected to heat, pressure, shock, or allowed to contact water, may cause a DANGEROUS REACTION

(some examples could be plastic monomers and cyanids)

Health Hazard - as above

Exploding Bomb

The above two pictograms replace the 1988 pictogram at left.

ABOVE: The 1988 WHMIS symbol / pictogram on left is no longer used.  Note the two pictograms on the right.


Exploding Bomb

For explosive, unstable hazards


NOTE:  The GHS system also defined an Environmental hazards group.  This group (and its classes) was not adopted into  WHMIS 2015.  ... but, you may still see the environmental classes listed on labels and SDSs.  Including information about environmental hazards is allowed by WHMIS 2015.

Environment

for materials that can cause damage to the aquatic environment or the ozone layer. 


Exclamation Mark

for materials that can cause health effects less serious than those using the health hazard pictogram


REGARDING ALL OF THE ABOVE PICTOGRAMS

- YOU MAY NOT REMEMBER THEIR NAME OR EXACT MEANING

HOWEVER

- IF YOU SEE ANY OF THESE PICTOGRAMS ON ANY WORKPLACE CONTAINER LABEL, 

STOP WORKING

UNTIL ... YOU TAKE A CLOSE LOOK AT THE LABEL 

AND

READ THE MSDS / (SDS)

- YOU WILL LEARN EVERYTHING YOU NEED FROM THE MSDS / (SDS) ABOUT THE SUBSTANCE OR PRODUCT IN ORDER TO BE ABLE TO WORK SAFELY AROUND OR WITH THE SPECIFIC LABELED MATERIAL 


The Biohazardous Pictogram on the right is under review for continued use in the 2015 WHMIS? (True or False)
A. False
B. True
The GHS uses a pictogram that was NOT ADOPTED by WHIMS 2015- However it is quite possible that you may "come across" this pictogram from time to time. What pictogram is it?
A. Environment
B. Exclamation Mark
C. Exploding Bomb

SUMMARY OF SOME EXEMPTIONS

Some products do not require the WHMIS HAZARD LABELS and SYMBOLS because they are already regulated by other labeling legislation. (i.e. Pesticides, Explosives, and Radioactive Material are just some examples) Also, when any CONTROLLED PRODUCT is being transported, the legislation then is that of TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS GOODS, even though, when the material (containers) arrive in a warehouse then they must be considered to be under WHMIS LEGISLATION.


Some examples of workplaces and the Hazardous Materials employees may be working with.


1) Fiberglass boat building;

    - acetone

    - fiberglass resin

    - paints

    - solvents

    - fiberglass dust


2) Wooden Furniture Manufacturing

    - the wood itself is not a concern

    - dust from sanding

    - wood finishing materials

    - various glues


3) Forestry Workers / Wildland Firefighters

    - gasoline

    - diesel

     - aviation fuel 

    - various fire retardents

    - various fire acellerators

    - propane (camps)

    - Bear Spray - this is unique in that it is sold in retail outlets and will probably not have a formal WHMIS label. However, these products should be transported in a special box outside of the area that drivers (or pilot) and passengers occupy.  You MUST ALWAYS CONSULT WITH THE HELICOPTER OR FIXED WING PILOT PRIOR TO BRINGING BEAR SPRAY OR OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ON BOARD!  THIS ALSO APPLIES TO MOTOR VEHICLE TRANSPORTATION. (CREW PASSENGER TRUCKS / BUSSES)


Exercise:

Make up a list of the hazardous materials that may be in your workplace - then, match these materials to the appropriate Class and/or Division and the actual Symbol.

1988 WHMIS

Example:  Gasoline - 

Class B - 
FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL

Class D - 
POISONOUS AND INFECTIOUS MATERIALS

Division 1

Division 2

2015 WHMIS

Example - Gasoline

Flammable

You may think of other controlled products that are in your place of employment.


If a CONTROLLED PRODUCT meets all the criteria of either the 1988 or WHMIS 2015, that PRODUCT is then regulated by WHMIS? (True or False)
A. False
B. True
1988 WHMIS has a total of eight pictograms. How many does the new, WHMIS 2015 have?
A. 6
B. 12
C. 10
If a product "falls" under the DANGEROUS GOODS ACT are they also controlled by WHMIS?
A. No
B. Yes





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